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lauriecheatham
Mar 02, 2021
In Elder Care Forum
Every year March is designated Women's History Month by Presidential proclamation. The month is set aside to honor women's contributions in American history. Did you know that Women's History Month started as Women's History Week? Women's History Month began as a local celebration in Santa Rosa, California. The Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (California) Commission on the Status of Women planned and executed a Women's History Week celebration in 1978. The organizers selected the week of March 8 to correspond with International Women's Day. The movement spread across the country as other communities initiated their own Women's History Week celebrations the following year. In 1980, a consortium of women's groups and historians, led by the National Women's History Project, successfully lobbied for national recognition. In February 1980, President Jimmy Carter issued the first Presidential Proclamation declaring the Week of March 8th 1980 as National Women's History Week. Here are some notable women worth celebrating. Maya Angelou - American poet, memoirist and civil rights activist. She published seven autobiographies, three books of essays, several books of poetry. Ruth Bader Ginsburg - Became the court's second female justice as well as the first Jewish female justice of the Supreme Court. Grace Hopper - a pioneering computer scientist and a US Navy Rear Admiral. Besides being an early programmer, she is considered the original "debugger" for removing a moth from a computer. She also invented the programing language compiler. Helen Keller - an author and lecturer, supporting women's and labor rights. A 1904 graduate of Radcliffe College, she was the first blind and deaf person to earn a college degree and later helped found the American Civil Liberties Union.
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lauriecheatham
Feb 02, 2021
In Elder Care Forum
In a recent New York Life's Life Insurance Gap study, African Americans report more financial stress than the overall population, but are more proactive about addressing it. Among the key factors driving increased financial stress, African Americans point to: Having Adequate savings: 50 percent of African Americans say having enough saved is a stressor, versus 42 percent of all adults. Debt: 42 percent of African Americans are concerned about debt levels versus 30 percent of all adults. Maintaining their current level of income: 46 percent of African Americans report being concerned about maintaining their current income versus 34 percent of all adults. African Americans view life insurance as a key component of their financial plan and as a vehicle for wealth transference. In fact, nearly 80 percent of African Americans rank having life insurance as a priority financial goal, versus just 63 percent of all adults, and 93 percent say it helps future generations succeed. In thinking about their financial futures, African Americans recognize the opportunity to use life insurance to protect their families and at the same time, create wealth for the Black community at large, says Eric Jackson, corporate vice president and market manager, New York Life. As more people recognize the value of this important tool, and the peace of mind that comes with seeking professional guidance, financial consultants work to be prepared to meet this special need. For more information on how life insurance, and financial planning can help secure the financial future for you and your family, contact me for a free overview. Laurie Cheatham 707-356-3388
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